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It Looks Like It’s The End Of The Road For Bimota

Massimo Tamburini’s Bimota Closes Its Doors For The Final Time

Published September 3, 2017

It’s with a heavy heart that we announce that the Italian motorcycle firm Bimota has finally bitten the dust. The main factory has now been officially closed. This won’t come as a massive surprise to those who have been falling Bimota’s slow demise over the last few years, but it doesn’t make the news any nicer to read. The Italian company has shut the doors on its Rimini factory for the final time, marking the end of an era for Italian motorcycles.

Bimota Logo

Is It The End For Bimota?

Bimota HB1

While Bimota’s Via Giaccaglia factory might not have been a powerhouse of industry for some time now, the signage has officially been removed. With only a handful of employees still attached to the Bimota name, it’s a shame to see what Massimo Tamburini’s – the undisputed master of motorcycle design – vision has been reduced to. If you’re not familiar with the work of Tamburini, his story and life in the motorcycle industry is the stuff of legend and a worthy of some further investigation. His mind was responsible for such delights as the Ducati 916 and the MV Agusta F4, but his career really began to take off after he founded a motorcycle firm with Valerio Bianchi and Giuseppi Morri. Combining the first to letters of each of their surnames, the company Bimota was formed. BI-MO-TA, get it?

Bimota KB2

The dream didn’t last forever though, since Morri eventually forced Tamburini to quit in 1985…and it was probably that exact moment that signified the beginning of the end for the Italian company. While the company’s more celebrated models undoubtedly came from the mind of Tamburini, such as the Bimota HB1, the DB1, or the KB2, the company still managed to keep themselves afloat for a long time after Tamburini’s departure.

Bimota DB1

It’s fair to say that some of their models weren’t exactly the best looking things on the market, but they certainly left an impression. Bimota Mantra – we’re talking about you in particular. Although many of Bimota’s other models, such as the DB7 Oronero were so ground breaking it’s incredible – the Oronero being the only road bike of its day with a fully carbon fiber chassis and swingarm design.

Bimota Tesi 3D

And of course, no conversation about Bimota is complete with referencing their iconic front swingarm arrangement too – but it’s funny quirks like this which the motorcycle industry will lose if Bimota gets laid to rest for good. We can only hope that the current owners of the trade name are open to offers for the rights, and that a wealthy motorcycle-mad philanthropist throws out a tempting enough offer to help keep this iconic motorcycle marque alive. Because otherwise, it will be sorely missed.

Bimota DB7 Onorero

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Joe Appleton
About Joe Appleton

I’ve done a bit of work here and there in the industry – I’ve even ridden a few bikes for actual money but what it comes down to is this: I ride bikes, build bikes and occasionally crash ‘em too. I like what I like but that certainly doesn’t make my opinion any more valid than yours…

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